Ollibean posts and articles about inclusive education for students with disabilities.

Autism and Changing Classroom Strategies

The field of autism is very new – not even 100 years old yet! This means we are constantly learning new things. We now know that what works for most children to learn does not always work for autistic children. In fact, it can be detrimental to their learning. Those of us in the field of autism will likely need to change the way we deliver help to those who seek it and change the way we teach our students.

Isn’t it a Pity? The Real Problem with Special Needs

The Real Problem with Special Needs We love this TEDx Talk from our friend, Torrie Dunlap, at Kids Included Together on benefits of inclusion and the real "problem" with special needs. [...]

Students with Disabilities Excel with High Expectations, Access, and Inclusion

"We know that when students with disabilities are held to high expectations, have access to a robust curriculum in the regular classroom, they excel." Secretary of Education , Arne Duncan [...]

Accessibility Is a Right Not a Privilege

Accessibility is a right not a privilege. 20 posts on Accessibility, Universal Design, and Inclusion   It's Time to Go Beyond Access Creating Equal Opportunities For ALL Students to [...]

Judith Snow ~ Relationships & Inclusion

"The research shows that when a child who is not academically gifted is included in a regular school, not only do the academics improve across the school, and I did say that, I didn’t say “in the classroom”, I said “across the school”, not only do the academics improve, but drug use and violence goes down."

Worth A Second Look: Haben Girma’s 2010 Speech on 35th Anniversary of IDEA

"One of the treasures of IDEA is that it provides children with disabilities the luxury of just being students. Unfortunately there are still many school districts where students with disabilities are denied their right to an education." Haben Girma

This Is Autism by Henry Frost

Best place for all autistic people, all disabled not disabled people, all families to speak together. Speak together for acceptance, inclusion, communication, and rights for all people. I am thinking when you look closely, this is what autism is.