Proudly Autistic by Amy Sequenzia

by Amy Sequenzia

Being proudly Autistic. Proudly Disabled.Being me.Amy Sequenzia on Ollibean ollibean.com/proudly-autistic

Being Proudly Autistic

Being proudly Autistic.
Being proudly Disabled.
Being me.
Telling my story because my voice is my own.
My story is mine to tell.
I define myself.

Since I was very young I have had an independent mind. Sometimes – no, many times – for a long time, I was silenced.
I was told to comply.
I was called names.
To many, I didn’t have dignity, I didn’t deserve dignity.

But I persevered.
Perseverated.
Persisted.

Some people saw my humanity.
To them, I let myself known.
Without words.
With smiles.
An occasional hug.
And joy in my eyes.

When words came to me through typing, I began telling my story.
But still, I was called names.
Some people – no, many people – dismissed my typed voice.
To them, disabled people don’t have the right to challenge the normative society’s assumptions about us.

I was silenced again.
But I didn’t lose my independent mind.
I was willingly non-compliant.
Because my story is mine to tell.
Because I am me.

I didn’t stop persisting.
Persevering.
Perseverating.

Until I found more people who would listen to me.
Or maybe they found me.
And I found my people.
They were telling their stories.
They were relentlessly persisting.

I found my people.
Disabled people.
I found my pride.
Disabled pride.
Autistic pride.

I tell my stories.
I define myself.

Amy Sequenzia
Amy SequenziaOllibean Writer

About the Author:

Amy Sequenzia is a non-speaking Autistic, multiply disabled activist and writer. Amy writes about disability rights, civil rights and human rights. She also writes poetry.
Amy has presented in several conferences in the US and abroad, and her work is featured in books about being Autistic and Disabled. Amy is deeply involved with the Neurodiversity Movement and has been outspoken about the rights and worthy of disabled people.
Amy serves on the Board of Directors of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN), and the Florida Alliance for Assistive Services and Technology (FAAST). http://nonspeakingautisticspeaking.blogspot.com and Autism Women’s Network. You can also follow Amy on Twitter at @AmySequenzia.

One Comment

  1. Leah Kelley October 6, 2017 at 12:18 am - Reply

    I love this so much, Amy ❤️
    I am so grateful you are in the world!

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